Blog

Roots Run Deep - Crystal Sutton

That tractor was a gift from my dad to my first son, Trent, because he thinks every kid needs a tractor. I don’t think he’s wrong either. I grew up in Brown Summit (some folks call it Browns Summit) in Guilford County just a couple of miles from NC Commissioner of Agriculture Steve Troxler. What I learned there was the value of hard work and that folks in agriculture were there for one another. I went off to NC State to study agriculture business management because professionally I wanted to be a part of the agriculture community. A group project changed my life. I was paired up with Brooks...
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Roots Run Deep - Tim Pace

The Great Depression hit farmers and family farms hard and my family’s farm was no exception. Despite all of the sweat, time, and tears my great-grandfather poured into farming, the poor economy of the early 30’s caused a financial crisis good land and good men couldn’t overcome. Suddenly, my family’s farm didn’t belong to our family any more. For many families the story ends here, but not this time… My grandfather had the opportunity to buy the farm back and instead of turning his back on that farm in Wendell, he poured his heart into it, again. Years passed as the soil was turned, crops...
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Sarah Grace Stone - Intern Spotlight

Hello! I am Sarah Grace Stone, the spring intern here at AgCarolina Farm Credit in the Raleigh, Smithfield, and Louisburg branches. I am so excited to be a part of the team! I grew up in Robeson County on my family's farm. I have spent most of my time growing up working cattle, harvesting crops, and running my family's roadside produce stand. I really enjoy riding my horse through the cow pastures at home, checking on the cows. I am a student at NC State, pursuing a degree in agricultural business management. In my free time, I lead a freshman Bible study with Cru and I am involved with the...
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Press Releases

Farm Credit Associations of NC donate through Pull for Youth

RALEIGH, NC – AgCarolina Farm Credit, Cape Fear Farm Credit, and Carolina Farm Credit are proud to announce the fundraising results of the fourth annual Pull for Youth sporting clays events to benefit NC 4-H and FFA. Over $400,000 has been donated directly to NC 4-H and FFA since 2017. A total donation of $100,000 was split evenly between North Carolina 4-H and FFA from the Farm Credit Associations of North Carolina. Funds were raised in conjunction with the three Pull for Youth sporting clays events held across North Carolina during the fall of 2020. “The Pull for Youth sporting clays shoots...
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Turtle Mist Farm

Upon retirement, Bob and Ginger Sykes had their hearts set on buying land and building a home outside of Washington, DC. After hitting some obstacles with the construction process, they decided to meander further south where they found a beautiful 60-acre farm that straddles the Granville and Franklin County lines. Bob fell in love with the farm instantly. He was intrigued by the history of the farm, and it immediately brought back wonderful childhood memories of his great uncle’s farm. “My great uncle farmed everything! I have vivid memories of milking a cow as a little boy, then I was put on...
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Press Releases

AgCarolina Farm Credit announces record patronage distribution of $28 million

Raleigh, NC — AgCarolina Farm Credit announces the distribution of their 2020 patronage distribution to members in February. The all-cash patronage is being paid in the amount of over $28 million to the members of AgCarolina Farm Credit. The amount is equal to a refund of 55% of accrued interest paid on member loans in 2020. “Record year” is the theme of this year’s patronage celebration, as AgCarolina is returning the highest patronage distribution in the history of the Association. "The strength of our agriculture and rural lending cooperative is reflected as we continue to put our profits...
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Roots Run Deep - Steve Starling

My father walked away from a job in 1957 the moment he was informed he did not get the promotion he’d been promised. He bought a brand new Ford 860 tractor and a corn picker to pull behind it on his way home that day. My surprised grandfather stood shocked beside my dad as they stared up at the shiny new machines on the bed of a delivery truck. A conversation began… Papa: Sure is a nice tractor. Daddy: Biggest one Ford makes. Papa: How’d you pay for it? Daddy: I didn’t…they put it on your credit. MF Starling became a full-time farmer that day and with the help of my mother, JoAnne, they farmed...
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Roots Run Deep - Roy Robertson

I’d like you to meet an old friend of mine. This Ferguson TO-20 is the first tractor my father bought in 1962. A few other things happened that year; dad and mom were married, dad left a promising career as a NC State Trooper to begin a new career in banking, and he officially began taking the reins of the family business – farming. My dad used to take off his necktie after work at the bank and put on his work boots to handle tasks around the farm. That work ethic was instilled in me at a very young age. He was committed to providing for his family just the same as I am committed to providing...
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Roots Run Deep - Cara Pace Dunnavant

For over 100 years, the Pace family has set their roots in the Archer Lodge community of Johnston County. “Historically, my family has grown row crops focusing on tobacco as many farm families have over the years in North Carolina. In 2016, when facing rising development pressures and increased urban sprawl, we began making plans to diversify – adding u-pick strawberries which led to subscription produce boxes which led to many events held on the farm. While farming and serving others in agriculture might be deep in my roots, many new faces around our community are at least one generation...
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Roots Run Deep - Antoine Moore

My father said, “Some people don’t care about old things like this.” I care about the tractor and the farmer standing behind me in this picture more than he will ever know. My father, like his father before him, and his father before him, worked the soil on our Perquimans County farm. He got a break from the farm once upon a time to take a bus to college at NC State University. He graduated into some of the most heartbreaking years farming has ever known… but he was determined to farm… and farm he did. Still does. Every year, we use my grandfather’s 1955 Case 400 that he bought new to cut...
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